Monthly Archives: August 2012

IE9, radio buttons and DIVs

I’m just getting back into some development of Online Time Clock MTS and had the pleasure of squashing an annoying bug today that was only appearing on IE9. I used the prototype javascript library pretty heavily in the development of this online system and getting the value of a group of radio buttons is something of a pain but can be done like this:

var selected_value = Form.getInputs('form_name','radio','radio_group_name').find(function(radio) { return radio.checked; }).value;

This returns the value of the selected radio button of the group you’re interested in. Works perfectly until you go and put a <DIV> </DIV> in the middle of your HTML radio buttons. Then IE9 decides that the radio buttons AFTER the div are no longer part of the radio group. The above javascript will then throw an exception if one of the radio buttons after the offending DIV is selected. The simple fix (for me at least) was to change the <DIV> to a <SPAN>

Fun With Gate Remotes

Broken Remote

Broken Remote

Don’t mess with me if you are a remote. Above are the broken remnants of a Gliderol TM-305C remote control that never worked properly. One day it chose to not work properly at the wrong time and as a result got smashed to bits by myself. Temper, temper. After calming down I bought another remote off of eBay thinking it wasn’t too much of a hassle because programming the remote to run our garage door is a doddle. Little did I think about how to program the remote to work our front gate. After some internet searches (useless) and poking about inside the gate actuator I figured out how to program the remote so I thought I would post it up here so I have a reminder of how to do it the next time I take out my frustrations on the remote control.

Deimos Gate Actuator

Deimos Gate Actuator

Above you can see the Deimos BT gate actuator that moves the gear rack attached to the bottom of our sliding gate. The actuator cover is held on by two stainless screws which when removed allow you to see the innards of the actuator as shown below.

Deimos Gate Actuator Innards

Deimos Gate Actuator Innards

The actuator looks pretty neat, at the top left you can see two 12V batteries so we can open the gate when the power is off. The grey box at the front contains the actuator controller and just peeking around the top right is a fashionable looking beige box that contains the receiver for the Gliderol remotes. I worked this out because someone had helpfully labelled the box “1814 G/Matic Receiver Stand Along”. “G/Matic” presumably stands for Glidermatic which is Gliderol’s name of choice for anything electrical or electronic.

Glidermatic Receiver Box

Glidermatic Receiver Box

Removing the natty beige cover was done by unscrewing four screws and hey presto we are in circuit board land.

Receiver Circuit Board

Receiver Circuit Board

Now this circuit board looked pretty identical to the receiver board in our Gliderol garage door opener (you can see the Gliderol Remote Training Instructions here). Given it’s similarity I used the same technique to program the remote. I pressed the button on the circuit board (indicated by the arrow labelled A) which made the LED on the board (labelled helpfully as B) switch on. Then I pressed the big button on the new Gliderol remote which made the LED turn off.

And hey presto. Pressing the top auxiliary button on the Gliderol remote made the gate open. I am not sure how the remote (or the gate actuator) knows to use the auxiliary button to work the gate instead of the main remote button. But hey, these are the things of electronic pixies and programmable fairies. Let’s leave some things unexplained so life is more interesting.